Monthly Archives: November 2011

Class 12: Lew Wasserman, MCA, and the New Media Conglomerate

In today’s class, we surveyed some of the contributions Lew Wasserman made between the 1940s and 1980s to the Hollywood system. With the fall of the studio system, the role of the movie mogul had become all but irrelevant. Wasserman as … Continue reading

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Jaws and the New Hollywood Industry

While scholars debate when the auteurist New Hollywood movement ended—it was either Apocalypse Now or Heaven’s Gate—Hollywood began to abandon the auteur centered film for the big blockbuster in the mid 1970s. No film represents that shift more than Jaws. The film’s theatrical trailer sets the tone using the conventions of the horror film. The […] Continue reading

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Final Exam Date and Time Announced

As we all know, Queens College has been notoriously slow at releasing the final exam schedule. At long last, we have been assigned a date and time for our final exam. It will be on Monday, December 19, at 1:45 … Continue reading

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When is Non-Diegetic Sound Actually Diegetic?

In my American Film Industry class, we voted on what film we would screen for our discussion of New Hollywood, or what I call “The American New Wave.” The class voted, among a list of six films, for Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (Martin Scorcese, 1974). Aside from talking about the cinematography in the film, […] Continue reading

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Cinematography for Emotional Distance

As I mentioned in class, the varied use of focal lengths is another technique that Scorcese manipulates, even in the same scenes. This is in addition to the heavy use of handheld camerawork, which itself was not widely used except in news and documentary filmmaking. I mentioned that the scene with Alice and Tommy in […] Continue reading

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Cinematography for Emotional Distance

As I mentioned in class, the varied use of focal lengths is another technique that Scorcese manipulates, even in the same scenes. This is in addition to the heavy use of handheld camerawork, which itself was not widely used except … Continue reading Continue reading

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Class 11: New Hollywood

In today’s class, we reviewed many of the factors that led to the US New Wave of filmmaking, which was known as the New Hollywood era. The movement was characterized by a reinvention of film style, re-imagining Hollywood genres, and … Continue reading

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Evaluate this Course

Take a few minutes to evaluate this course. The evaluation survey is conducted online and available at the following website: http://www.qc.cuny.edu/evaluate Thank you for your participation.

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Next Week’s Seventies Flick

The votes are in. The winner of this year’s student selected Pick a Seventies Flick is Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore. Twenty students voted in the poll, and each of the 20 students will receive four point extra credit on … Continue reading

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Class 10: 1967 and the Youth Audience

In today’s class, we discuss how the 1968 Academy Awards ceremony signaled a seismic shift for filmmaking in the United States. No longer were the studios and their big-budget, something-for-everyone the focus of the industry and the audience. Instead, many … Continue reading

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